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Union des Syndicats Saint-Emilion-Pomerol-Fronsac Conseil des Vins de Saint-Emilion

14 rue Guadet, 33330 Saint-Emilion
France

Hall map

ProWein 2018 hall map (Hall 11): stand J80

Fairground map

ProWein 2018 fairground map: Hall 11

Our range of products

Product categories

  • 01  Wines (according to cultivable areas)
  • 01.01  Europe
  • 01.01.05  France
  • 01.01.05.04  Bordeaux

Our products

Product category: Bordeaux

MERLOT, LORD OF SAINT-EMILION

MERLOT, SILKY AND FRUITY, REPRESENTS ON AN AVERAGE TWO THIRDS OF THE PLANTATIONS.
Over time, the winemakers of Saint-Emilion have selected three cépages particularly suited to their terroirs and showcased it wonderfully.

THE TERROIR, AT THE BEGINNING OF THE MAGIC OF SAINT-EMILION
Saint-Emilion is a world apart. Surrounded by two rivers, the Isle and the Dordogne, crossed by two small tributaries of the Isle, Saint-Emilion has a very favorable microclimate. Temperate oceanic climate, a tiny bit more continental than in the rest of Bordeaux, this microclimate is characterized by well distributed rainfall during the year and its hot, dry summers. The benevolent presence of the four rivers moderates the summer heat as well as the rigors of the winter. The gently sloping soils, predominantly clay and limestone, completethis ideal setting for the development of the vine.

THE CÉPAGES OF SAINT-EMILION
On this particular terroir the personalities of four cépages are expressed: Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and, to some extent, Malbec. Cabernet Franc (or Bouchet), which is tannic and very aromatic, accounts for nearly a third of the plantations. Very demanding to grow, it ripens about two weeks after Merlot. The third cépage, the Cabernet Sauvignon, reinforces the tannins and the aging potential. It accounts for a tenth of the production. Cabernet Sauvignon thrives especially on dry and warm soils and brings spicy notes to the wine. Finally, one last cépage, the Malbec makes a few discrete appearances.

THE ELEGANCE OF THE SAINT-EMILION MERLOT
Over the centuries, Merlot has become the favored cépage of Saint-Emilion. It reaches perfect maturity that allows it to express all of its character during the winemaking process. Its importance in the assembly sets the tone: that of a refined elegance but not devoid of simplicity. Merlot is recognizable by its roundedness in the mouth, its aromatic complexity pulling through blackberry and cherry flavors and its rich alcohol content. This beautiful presence allows the Saint-Emilion wines to subtly interact with game-based or spicy dishes. The intense ruby color that coats the young Saint-Emilion wine, already very pleasant to drink, is another gift from Merlot.

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Product category: Bordeaux

THE WINES OF SAINT-EMILION, A SKILFUL BLEND OF GRAPES...

THE THREE MAIN GRAPE VARIETIES USED TO PRODUCE THE WINES OF ST. EMILION ARE MERLOT, CABERNET FRANC AND CABERNET SAUVIGNON
The variety of wines produced in Saint-Emilion is a result of the skilful blending of different grape varieties. The quality of a wine obviously depends on the organoleptic potential of the grapes which made it, qualities such as: sugar content, aromatic complexity, quantity and fineness of tannins, colour intensity etc. The three main varieties planted in St. Emilion are Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. The AOC classifications of Saint-Emilion and Saint-Emilion Grand Cru are also allowed to use two other grape varieties: Malbec (or Cot) and Carmenère. Of these only Malbec is still found, and only very occasionally.

Each grape variety has its own character, resulting from its ability to thrive in different soils. To achieve the best quality grapes, winegrowers choose the grape variety which will thrive in their particular natural environment.

The Saint-Emilion and Saint-Emilion Grand Cru classifications are composed of 60% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Franc, 10% Cabernet Sauvignon and a small scattering of Malbec.
The Puisseguin Saint-Emilion and Lussac Saint-Emilion classifications are composed mostly of Merlot, 80% and 70% respectively, alongside Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec.

MERLOT
This grape is the most widely represented variety. An early-ripening grape, it thrives in almost all Bordeaux soils but especially appreciates the cool, moist, clay-textured soils of Saint-Emilion. Ages well and gives the wine its rich colour and alcohol content, along with good aromatic complexity (of ripe red and black fruits), suppleness and roundness, giving a silky sensation on the palate.

THE CABERNET FRANC
Cabernet Franc is mainly planted in the Libourne region. Ripening neither very early nor particularly late, it is mostly cultivated in limestone soils or soils of a slightly warmer texture (sand or gravel). These grapes give the wine an aromatic subtlety, with a lightly spiced flavour, freshness and a pronounced tannic structure which allows the wine to age well.

CABERNET SAUVIGNON
A late-ripening variety particularly suited to hot, dry soils (sandy or gravelly or well exposed clay-limestone soils). These grapes give the wine spicy and complex flavours, as well as a tannic richness which makes for a long, harmonious ageing process.

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About us

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A BRIEF LOOK BACK AT THE HISTORY OF THIS VINEYARD WITH AN EXCEPTIONAL LONGEVITY.
Leased by the Gallo-Roman poet Ausonius in the first century BC, the wines of Saint-Emilion have been appreciated for more than two thousand years.

FIRST VINES IN SAINT-EMILION
More than 30 000 years ago, the Paleolithic men settled in Saint-Emilion, attracted by the natural caves, forests and its generous waters. It was not until the Roman colonization, which began in 56 BC, that the first wine amphorae were produced there. It was at this time that the Cumbis forest was cut down and the first vines planted. The Romans then choose to graft varieties used around Massilla (Marseille), on vitis biturica vines, a vine present in the Southwest. In Saint-Emilion, the great history of viticulture began.

SAINT-EMILION, THE ORIGINS OF THE NAME
In the fifth century, the collapse of the Roman Empire marked the end of the Roman peace and prosperity that accompanied it. The survival and spread of viticulture was then much up to Christianity, which made wine a central element of worship. The religious cultivated the vine, but it was not until the eleventh century and the arrival of the Benedictines in Saint-Emilion that viticulture found a new boom. Meanwhile, the village had found a name inspired by an eighth-century monk from Brittany. On the way to Compostelle, Emilion stopped in a cave near the Dordogne and decided to settle there. On his death in 787, his followers built the famous monolithic church in Saint-Emilion.

THE "CRU", A LEGACY OF THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT
The Middle Ages left significant marks on the landscape and structures of Saint-Emilion. The Jurade, founded in 1199, is a reminder of the English presence. The extreme fragmentation of today’s vineyards is also due to the small size of the medieval farms. However, the age of enlightenment shook Saint-Emilion. In the eighteenth century, a generation of owners marked their time developing new methods for viticulture. Passionate of agronomy, Combret de la Nauze or Jacques Kanon conducted major operations and completed the selection of grape varieties. With this work close to the terroir, the concept of "Cru" appeared for the best wines.

WINEMAKERS’ SOLIDARITY IN SAINT-EMILION
In the second half of the nineteenth century, Saint-Emilion was not immune to the Phylloxera crisis that affected all French vineyards. Winemakers from Saint-Emilion collectively overcame this ordeal. In 1884, they founded the first Winemakers’ Union of France. Dynamic and innovative, the Winemakers' Union of Saint-Emilion originated, in 1931, as the first wine cooperative of Bordeaux. Later, in 1948, the winemakers of Saint-Emilion recreated the famous Jurade, which had been dissolved during the French Revolution. Since 2007, the Winemakers' Union of Saint-Emilion is associated with the Winemakers’ Unions of Lussac Saint-Emilion and Puisseguin Saint-Emilion, as a part of Saint-Emilion Wines Advisory Board.

SAINT-EMILION, A WORLD HERITAGE
Throughout the twentieth century, the Saint-Emilion winemakers have worked to improve the wines and to define quality criteria. The establishment of the AOC Saint-Emilion and the introduction of a revised ranking in 1954 were crucial steps. They assert the huge reputation of Saint-Emilion wines in the ever increasingly international public’s minds. Moreover, this is where, on a global level, the unique history of the vineyards of Saint-Emilion is consecrated. In 1999 it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as part of the cultural landscape. This recognition salutes a history of over 2000 years of close interactions between the people and an exceptional terroir.

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