Napa Valley Vintners

P.O. Box 141, 94574 St. Helena, CA
1475 Library Lane, 94574 St. Helena, CA
USA

Telephone +1 707 9633388
Fax +1 707 9633488
reception2@napavintners.com

Trade fair hall

  • Hall 9 / A27
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ProWein 2017 hall map (Hall 9): stand A27

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ProWein 2017 fairground map: Hall 9

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Connor Best

Education Manager

Stacey Dolan Capitani

Vice President of Marketing

Our range of products

Product categories

  • 01  Wines (according to cultivable areas)
  • 01.03  NORTH AMERICA
  • 01.03.03  USA
  • 01.03.03.01  California

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Dec 21, 2016

Five Things to Know About Napa Valley’s 2016 Vintage

Winemakers share their thoughts as attention turns to the cellar following a challenge-free growing season that has resulted in another outstanding wine grape harvest

St. Helena, CA – From Carneros to Calistoga, Napa Valley’s winemakers are smiling from ear-to-ear over what appears to be yet another great vintage in the making, according to members of the Napa Valley Vintners (NVV) nonprofit trade association. Here are five things every wine lover should know about Napa Valley’s 2016 vintage:

 # 1 - This year has the potential to be another outstanding Napa Valley vintage.

Napa Valley wines from 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 are coming into the market to accolades and critical acclaim. Is it possible that 2016 will be the fifth great vintage in a row for Napa Valley? “I don’t know what to say other than somebody up there really loves us,” commented Linda Neal, owner of Tierra Roja Vineyards in Oakville.

Kristin Belair, winemaker for Honig Vineyard & Winery, summed up the growing season and harvest this way: “We had cooperative weather and problem-free fermentations which are resulting in intense, balanced wines.”

 #2 - Technology and people combined to create high quality wines.

In the winery, more vintners are using optical sorters to ensure only the best grapes become wine. A few machine destemmers are popping up on the crush pad, gently processing grapes faster than before, creating efficiencies that allow vintners to bring in their fruit at the exact moment it's ready to be picked.

 “We brought in new equipment that did a great job of gently destemming all of our reds in a timely manner,” said Melissa Apter, winemaker at Antica Napa Valley – Antinori Family Wine Estate. “We were able to pick as much as we needed to in a day, even more than our past maximum tonnage, and it processed the fruit faster and in a higher quality than ever before. It was the star of the season.”

In the vineyard, evapotranspiration sensors help vintners and growers determine how often and how much to water their vines, information critical to efficient water management. Other vintners are experimenting with drones that can pinpoint vine vigor and identify areas that might need special attention during the growing season.

But, at the end of the day, according to Jon Ruel, CEO of Trefethen Family Vineyards, it’s still the people who make a difference: “It is the men and women of our vineyard and winery teams that deserve the credit for crafting yet another fantastic vintage,” said Ruel. “We still do so much by hand and, when checking fermentations, by nose. And we are not looking to change that any time soon.” 

#3 - The grapes may be picked, but the work isn’t over yet.

“The grape harvest is, first and foremost, getting the grapes off the vine and to the winery,” said Dawnine Dyer of Dyer Vineyard. “It is replete with the unique question of ripeness, the status of the vineyard and the urgency of weather. It's always a relief to have the crop in the winery where we begin the slower, more controlled, process of making the wines.”

Throughout Napa Valley, harvest duties have transitioned from 24-hour days and seven-day weeks in the vineyard to ‘pump-overs, punch-downs and barreling down’ in the cellar, terms that refer to the next phase of the winemaking process. “This is the tough time of year where the excitement of harvest wanes but there is still so much to do,” said Tom Farella, winemaker at Farella Vineyard. “I call it the ‘post-crush blues’ where motivation is difficult but so many details and tasks remain.”

Outside, vintners and growers are planting cover crops, installing straw in the vineyards and cleaning and putting away equipment so it’s ready for next year. According to Alexander Eisele of Volker Eisele Family Estate, “We are seeding cover crops within the rows and adding erosion control seeds in the vineyard roads as well as straw and silt fences; everything we can do to keep our precious soil from washing away.”

#4 - The first wines from this harvest will be on store shelves by early next year.

Aromatic white wines, like Sauvignon Blanc, will be the first Napa Valley wines to be released in early 2017. Rosé wines are typically the next to follow, just in time for spring and early summer sipping. Lighter reds, like Pinot Noir, will start entering the market by late summer and early fall of next year. The region’s renowned Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and other red wines that require barrel aging will make their debut beginning in 2018.

#5 - There’s one stop for detailed information about Napa Valley’s 2016 wine grape harvest.

To see photos, videos, reports and social media posts about Napa Valley’s 2016 harvest, visit napavintners.com/harvest

About the Napa Valley Vintners
The Napa Valley Vintners nonprofit trade association has been cultivating excellence since 1944 by inspiring its more than 525 members to consistently produce wines of the highest quality, to provide environmental leadership and to care for the extraordinary place they call home. Learn more at napavintners.com.

Contact: Patsy McGaughy, Communications Director - 707.968.4207, pmcgaughy@napavintners.com

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Dec 21, 2016

Porto Wine Region Salutes Napa Valley Vintners

St. Helena, CA - Portuguese wine industry leaders have officially recognized four members of the Napa Valley Vintners (NVV) nonprofit trade association for voluntarily discontinuing the use of the term ‘port’ for their fortified dessert wines. Pictured L-R: Judd Wallenbrock, Jessup Cellars; Michael Maher, Freemark Abbey; Stan Boyd, Boyd Family Vineyards; George Sandeman, Confraria do Vinho do Porto; Vance Thompson, Jessup Cellars; Andrew Schweiger, Schweiger Vineyards.
On October 27 in San Francisco, the Confraria do Vinho do Porto inducted Boyd Family Vineyards, Freemark Abbey, Jessup Cellars and Schweiger Vineyards into their organization. In June, the Confraria also recognized the NVV for its work to protect winegrowing region names worldwide. The Confraria’s mission is to communicate, promote and reinforce the worldwide reputation of Port wine.

"Boyd Family, Freemark Abbey, Jessup Cellars and Schweiger Vineyards personify the shared belief among the NVV and my colleagues in Porto that all winegrowing place names should be respected and protected," said Confraria Chancellor George Sandeman. "We salute those esteemed Napa Valley winemakers."

The NVV began working with Porto in 2005, with the signing of the Joint Declaration to Protect Wine Place and Origin. Other founding members of the Declaration include Champagne, Sherry, Willamette Valley, Oregon, Walla Walla and Washington state. Today the partnership features 20 famous wine regions, collaborating to promote the belief that place of origin is important to the production of quality wine. The day after the Confraria’s induction ceremony, Declaration members met in San Francisco to discuss plans and activities for 2017 and beyond.

About the Napa Valley Vintners
The Napa Valley Vintners nonprofit trade association has been cultivating excellence since 1944 by inspiring its more than 525 members to consistently produce wines of the highest quality, to provide environmental leadership and to care for the extraordinary place they call home. Learn more at napavintners.com.

Contact: Patsy McGaughy, Communications Director - 707.968.4207, pmcgaughy@napavintners.com

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Dec 21, 2016

Napa Valley Vintners Grants $6 Million to Community Health Nonprofits:

Auction Napa Valley proceeds help provide critical services to more than 72,000 clients in Napa County

St. Helena, CA--The Napa Valley Vintners (NVV) wine trade association today announced grants totaling $6 million from Auction Napa Valley proceeds to 17 nonprofits that provide community health services. These Napa County organizations provide a broad spectrum of services in the areas of physical and mental health, family support and assistance for seniors.Today’s announcement follows NVV grants made earlier this fall of $2.8 million to nonprofits in the area of children’s education and a recent announcement of $6 million to help construct the new OLE Health facility in south Napa. In total, the NVV has given $170 million through Auction Napa Valley proceeds to Napa County nonprofit organizations since 1981.

The 17 nonprofits receiving Auction Napa Valley funding under the community health umbrella provided 167,000 patient visits to more than 72,000 Napa County clients (25,286 of which are under 18) in the 2015 calendar year, according to the NVV’s most recent Grants Report.

“We are grateful for the generosity of our vintners, bidders, volunteers and businesses who contribute each and every year to Auction Napa Valley in support of the health and wellbeing of our community,” commented Emma Swain, chair of the NVV Board of Directors and CEO of St. Supéry Estate Vineyards & Winery. “The impact of care and services afforded so many people in Napa County as a result of this funding is both humbling and inspiring.”

A new grantee organization this year is Girls on the Run, which focuses on empowerment of girls ages 8-13 through promotion of healthy behaviors and self-esteem. This is also the second year NVV has provided secure, unrestricted, multi-year grants to five organizations in the community health sector: COPE, Collabria Care, Mentis, NEWS and St. Helena Hospital’s Birth Center. Leading philanthropic research indicates that multi-year funding allows organizations to more effectively plan for the needs of their clients, as well as leverage the secured grants for further funding.

Although Aldea Children & Family Services has consistently been part of a core group of nonprofits receiving NVV grants, a new Aldea-led program called Courage Village was made possible in part due to Auction Napa Valley proceeds. Courage Village is a suicide prevention and community engagement project that was developed in the tragic wake of two youth suicides in Napa, within weeks of one another, in the spring of 2016.

“Suicide prevention programs are an underfunded area of mental health services,” noted Mark Bontrager, executive director of Aldea Children & Family Services. “Without the funding support for Courage Village from partners like the Napa Valley Vintners, we would be significantly limited in providing the mental health services that our community, like many communities, desperately needs.”

Another longtime NVV grantee organization in this giving sector, Napa Emergency Women’s Services (NEWS) has been able to expand its programs and inclusive approach to domestic violence and sexual abuse services as a result of funding from Auction Napa Valley proceeds.

Learn more about the nonprofit community health organizations that received recent funding. 

To read Stories of Impact and meet some of the people who have been helped by Auction Napa Valley proceeds, visit auctionnapavalley.org/giving.

About Auction Napa Valley Auction Napa Valley is the NVV's annual community fundraiser that for more than 35 years has utilized the worldwide reputation of Napa Valley wines and the scenic beauty of the region to raise funds to enhance the health and wellbeing of the Napa Valley community. To date, the NVV has invested $170 million from Auction Napa Valley proceeds in Napa County nonprofit organizations. Learn more at auctionnapavalley.org.

About the Napa Valley Vintners The Napa Valley Vintners nonprofit trade association has been cultivating excellence since 1944 by inspiring its more than 525 members to consistently produce wines of the highest quality, to provide environmental leadership and to care for the extraordinary place they call home. Learn more at napavintners.com.

Contact: Cate Conniff, Communications Manager, cconniff@napavintners.com, 707.968.4229

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About the Napa Valley Wine Region
Napa Valley is celebrated for consistently producing wines of the highest quality. We are committed to a culture of excellence, providing environmental leadership and caring for our extraordinary valley. Learn more at napavintners.com.

About the Napa Valley Vintners

The Napa Valley Vintners nonprofit trade association has been cultivating excellence since 1944 by inspiring its more than 525 members to consistently produce wines of the highest quality, to provide environmental leadership and to care for the extraordinary place they call home. Learn more at napavintners.com.

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